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Finding Vivian Maier is the critically acclaimed documentary about a mysterious nanny, who secretly took over 100,000 photographs that were hidden in storage lockers and, discovered decades later, is now among the 20th century’s greatest photographers. Directed by John Maloof and Charlie Siskel, the film is riveting—a history of modern photography, a psychological study and a noir tale of mystery. 

Finding Vivian Maier is the critically acclaimed documentary about a mysterious nanny, who secretly took over 100,000 photographs that were hidden in storage lockers and, discovered decades later, is now among the 20th century’s greatest photographers. Directed by John Maloof and Charlie Siskel, the film is riveting—a history of modern photography, a psychological study and a noir tale of mystery. 

Tags dog thebark the bark magazine finding vivian maier vivien maier photography photo noir documentary

California—An important new bill has passed and signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown protecting abandoned animals has been signed into law in the state of California. AB 1810 removes a state mandate to euthanize any animal abandoned at an animal care facility, including veterinary offices, spay/neuter clinics, animal hospitals, and grooming facilities, if a new home is not found within 24 days. Photograph by Susan Sabo.

California—An important new bill has passed and signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown protecting abandoned animals has been signed into law in the state of California. AB 1810 removes a state mandate to euthanize any animal abandoned at an animal care facility, including veterinary offices, spay/neuter clinics, animal hospitals, and grooming facilities, if a new home is not found within 24 days. Photograph by Susan Sabo.

Tags dog thebark dogs bill politics california government

Last night, this Jeff Koons’s sculpture “Balloon Dog (Orange)” fetched $58.4 million at the largest art auction sale ever. The amount set an auction record for a living artist. The event, presented by Christie’s International in New York, featured blue chip works by Andy Warhol, Willem de Kooning and Francis Bacon, whose painting “Three Studies of Lucian Freud” sold for $142.4 million, another record setting figure for the highest auction sale ever. Koons’s sculpture of the balloon figure is made of stainless steel with a mirror finish. Between 1994 and 2000, the artist fabricated five unique versions—one each in orange, yellow, blue, magenta and red. The 12-foot high sculpture was sold by collector Peter Brant on behalf of the Brant Foundation Art Study in Greenwich, Connecticut, to raise endowment funds.

Last night, this Jeff Koons’s sculpture “Balloon Dog (Orange)” fetched $58.4 million at the largest art auction sale ever. The amount set an auction record for a living artist. The event, presented by Christie’s International in New York, featured blue chip works by Andy Warhol, Willem de Kooning and Francis Bacon, whose painting “Three Studies of Lucian Freud” sold for $142.4 million, another record setting figure for the highest auction sale ever. Koons’s sculpture of the balloon figure is made of stainless steel with a mirror finish. Between 1994 and 2000, the artist fabricated five unique versions—one each in orange, yellow, blue, magenta and red. The 12-foot high sculpture was sold by collector Peter Brant on behalf of the Brant Foundation Art Study in Greenwich, Connecticut, to raise endowment funds.

Tags The Bark dog magazine fine art Jeff Koons Balloon Dog

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Bark contributor Mark Ulriksen has a series of 6 posters created for the San Francisco Arts Commission’s Art on Market Street Program — each of the images highlights a uniquely San Franciscan locale and activity. One shows Fort Funston, a stretch of beach south of the city that is a popular dog-friendly destination. All of the posters can be seen in bus shelters along Market Street, San Francisco’s main thoroughfare, until mid-January 2014.

Bark contributor Mark Ulriksen has a series of 6 posters created for the San Francisco Arts Commission’s Art on Market Street Program — each of the images highlights a uniquely San Franciscan locale and activity. One shows Fort Funston, a stretch of beach south of the city that is a popular dog-friendly destination. All of the posters can be seen in bus shelters along Market Street, San Francisco’s main thoroughfare, until mid-January 2014.

Tags the bark dog magazine mark ulriksen dog-friendly fort funston

 Source thebark.com